We speak: We speak
613 791 5777
24/7 Emergency Service
plumbing

Whether you are a first-time homeowner or not, you may be wondering why water does not come through to your basement. Weeping tile is the answer.

What is a Weeping Tile?

Weeping tiles are 4” hollow porous pipes employed in discharging water from the ground. Whenever the pipe drains, it releases liquids into the sump pump liner installed beneath your basement surface. A weeping tile system is a significant advancement towards making your basement water-resistance.

Installing a Weeping Tile

Fitting an internal weeping tile entails digging a channel across the circumference of the basement floor. We then add a drainage membrane, like a delta membrane, to the plain foundation wall to channel water beneath the underground slab onto the weeping tile.

How Weeping Tiles Work

Weeping tiles collect water pooling at the footing level. It pushes the water into the cesspool pump until it builds sufficient energy to get into the house.

Weeping tiles come in two types. These are;

Exterior and interior weeping tiles.

Exterior weeping tiles (also known as French drains) work for drainage on the surface. The exterior weeping tiles take care of drainage before they enter your house. Contractors install it in dug channels around the outer part of the residence.

The French drains scheme comprises a sloped ditch, tubing, and gravel. 

Steps and Details of Installing an Exterior Weeping Tile

Digging a Trench 

It requires a channel 12- inch wide dug surrounding the outside circumference of the home. The trench must slope one inch for every eight feet.

Applying the Gravel

Contractors require either river or granite. Our contractors pour 2″ to 3″ of the sand to the trench’s base.

Laying the Pipe

Next follows a pipe set on the applied gravel. We use landscape fabric to wrap the tube so that there are no potential damages in the future. A clean-out linkage remains raised above the ground for future maintenance.

Overlaying the Trench

A mixture of gravel and sand provides easy access. To hide the weeping tile entirely, we add dirt to the gravel together with sod. That gives room for planting grass.

Interior weeping tile is a superb alternative in case of exterior structure failure. We install it beneath the basement floor.

It runs water to a sump pump, via the lines, then to the external storm sewer.

Weeping Tile and Backyard Runoff

When there’s a lot of water pooling in the backyard long after a storm, it is a red flag. However, the French drain system is a perfect solution. It uses the same principle as when removing basement flooding.

Our contractors cut a trench on a gentle slope. What follows next is installing the weeping tile. They apply a sheet comprising gravel and crushed rocks on the upper side.

Flooded water sieves through the dirt, then passes through the tubing and out of the flooded field.

Window Well and Weeping Tile

In case your window well floods, the weeping tile system can redirect the flood. The process involves;

  • Taking out the window well.
  • Clearing away the mud from the well.
  • Decreasing the pipe and attaching it with a 4″ T-connection.
  • Inserting a drain cover onto the pipe, then covering the dug region with gravel.
  • Changing the window well set.

Maintaining the Weeping Tile

Maintaining a weeping tile involves;

  • Stamping out leaves and rubbish from the window wells together with the gutters.
  • Ensuring the sump pump functions optimally.
  • Doing routine checkups to guard against pooling water or mushy soil.

What Can Be Wrong With the Weeping Tile (Plugging)

In case the weeping tile’s efficiency is compromised, it could be because of the following reasons;

Blockage by soil and tree roots. It fails to drain water faster and therefore cracks and leaks due to too much pressure.

Dr.Pipe
Call Now Button